Being a Maker: Just Create Something Everyday

Being a Maker: Just Create Everyday:  If you want to expand your creativity, create something everyday.  Even if it sucks.  Just keep building the habit.  Now go make opportunities for your students to do this.

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Just create something.  Everyday.

I love to read books about creativity and the artist’s process.  It’s fascinating to learn the stories of authors, artists and other creatives and learn about their how they create their works.  And there’s a common theme I’ve noticed in all of them.

No matter what.  Sit down and create something everyday.

Writers will talk about how they sit down in front of their computer/typewriter/notebook, set a timer, and just write.  What comes out might be trash. Or it might be the start of your next great novel. It’s a discipline. It’s showing up everyday and getting the words out of your head and onto the paper.  (Which is how I’m writing the first draft of this post by the way – I try to write at least five minutes each morning before work).

I’ve found many artists of all mediums have similar methods.  If you’re struggling to decide on what to create, just get out your paints and create something.  Cut out those pictures and start piecing together the collages. Doodle until the picture starts to form.  Again, what comes out of this might not look like much, but it will lead to greater things.

Helping our students to create something everyday

I remember having daily journal prompts in several of my middle and high school English classes.  I loved this, because they got me writing everyday. They gave me something to start with. And they let me create something.

How can we empower our students, in our makerspaces, in our classrooms, in our libraries, to create everyday?  Can we have materials always set out and available? A daily or weekly prompt or design challenge? Maybe even a set time, like five minutes at the beginning of class, to just tinker and create without worrying about what the end goal is or what their grade will be.   I think we would be amazed at what comes of it.

While we’re on the subject, here’s a few of my favorite books on creativity and the artist’s process:

Do you have a creativity book recommendation?  Leave a comment and let us know 🙂


Diana Rendina, MLIS, is the media specialist at Tampa Preparatory School, an independent 6-12 in Tampa, FL. Previously, she was the media specialist at Stewart Middle Magnet School for seven years, where she founded their library makerspace. She is the creator of the blog RenovatedLearning.com & is also a monthly contributor to AASL Knowledge Quest. Diana is the winner of the 2016 ISTE Outstanding Young Educator Award, the 2015 ISTE Librarians Network Secondary Award, the 2015 AASL Frances Henne Award & the 2015 SLJ Build Something Bold Award. She is an international speaker on the Maker Movement and has presented at conferences including AASL, FETC & ISTE. Diana co-authored Challenge-Based Learning in the School Library Makerspace with Colleen and Aaron Graves and is also the author Reimagining Library Spaces: Transform Your Space on Any Budget.

Comments

  1. Judy Merrill-Smith : April 23, 2018 at 8:56 am

    Thanks for this post. You’ve got me thinking about how to leave out some creative materials and/or a prompt each week.

    My current favorite creativity book is Elizabeth Gilbert’s “Big Magic.” It’s like a loving pep talk from a wise friend.

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