Demco Post: 3 Design Challenges for the Low Tech Makerspace

3 Design Challenges for the Low Tech Makerspace : Check out my Demco post to read up on three different design challenges you can do with your students in a low-tech/no-tech makerspace. All are budget friendly and easy to do.

Check out my post on Demco to learn more about design challenges in low tech makerspaces!

Many educators have the misconception that makerspace activities always need to involve expensive technology like 3-D printers and circuit kits. But this isn’t true. Students can have amazing learning experiences in makerspaces with low-tech and no-tech tools.

Design challenges are a favorite tool of mine for inspiring student creativity in makerspaces (that’s why I co-wrote a book about them).  And by using low-tech materials in combination with design challenges, you can easily and affordably inspire student creativity.  Low-tech materials remind us that a makerspace is not defined by the specific materials and tools they contain, but rather by the learning experiences they create for students.

3 Design Challenges for the Low Tech Makerspace

To help make it easier for you to try out low-tech design challenges, I’ve written up prompts (based off the format in the book), supply lists and recommended resources.  Many of the supplies are things you may already have in your makerspace. If you don’t, you can easily source them.

Click on over to see the prompts and details for each design challenge

  • The Cardboard Creature Challenge
  • Tech Take-Apart Robot Challenge
  • Recycled Book Art Gallery Challenge

Do you have a favorite low-tech or no tech makerspace activity?  Share it out in the comments!


Diana Rendina, MLIS, is the media specialist at Tampa Preparatory School, an independent 6-12 in Tampa, FL. Previously, she was the media specialist at Stewart Middle Magnet School for seven years, where she founded their library makerspace. She is the creator of the blog RenovatedLearning.com & is also a monthly contributor to AASL Knowledge Quest. Diana is the winner of the 2016 ISTE Outstanding Young Educator Award, the 2015 ISTE Librarians Network Secondary Award, the 2015 AASL Frances Henne Award & the 2015 SLJ Build Something Bold Award. She is an international speaker on the Maker Movement and has presented at conferences including AASL, FETC & ISTE. Diana co-authored Challenge-Based Learning in the School Library Makerspace with Colleen and Aaron Graves and is also the author Reimagining Library Spaces: Transform Your Space on Any Budget.